Showing posts tagged communities

Connecting within our communities

People are stronger when they pull together. Here are some tips from the Mental Health Foundation about how we can connect within our communities.

•Join or set up a neighbourhood group.
•Hold a poetry evening related to connection.
•Organise a street BBQ.
•Attend a community centre open day.
•Organise or attend cultural performances – in a shopping centre or park.
•Take time to read your local newspaper or newsletter – find out what’s going on in your local area – then organise a group outing to support it.

How are you connecting with your community this week?

Dunne: pilot to support communities losing major industry

Monday, 27 May 2013, 11:15 am
Press Release: New Zealand Government

Monday, 27 May 2013 

Media Release


Dunne: pilot to support communities losing major industry


Communities are going to be better supported to cope with the loss of a major employer or industry through an initiative being trialled in the new suicide prevention plan launched by Associate Health Minister Peter Dunne today.


‘Unemployment is a known risk factor for suicide and in New Zealand, there is a high co-relation between unemployment and youth suicide, particularly among young Māori males.

“Communities that are particularly dependent on one employer or industry are also particularly vulnerable if that employer or industry fails.


“Small towns can struggle to cope with the sudden fall in income and population, and the financial pressure and sense of loss can be traumatic for individuals and families, with sometimes tragic results,” Mr Dunne said.

He said the initiative was one of 30 specific actions in the New Zealand Suicide Prevention Action Plan 2013 to 2016 that involve eight government agencies


Led by the Ministry of Social Development, the trial would see the ministry partner with a small number of local communities to support them before and after the loss of a major employer or industry.

“Evidence points to the importance of communities themselves leading any revival, but partnerships with government agencies, business and other groups can be vital to a successful transition,” he said.

‘Ultimately, the aim would be for a community to guide the response with government agencies taking its cue from the community and working with it to support its vision and strategy.”

District Health Boards will also be given support for suicide prevention through the development of a toolkit for DHBs which will focus on managing suicide clusters or contagion, Mr Dunne said.

Families, whānau and communities are often best placed to implement suicide prevention activities, he said.


The plan will support strong, cohesive and self-determining communities. It will also enable communities to build capacity and leadership and give them the tools to respond to people in distress and support them to seek help.


“Suicide is everyone’s business – families, whānau and communities must all come together to tackle this problem,” he said.


The full plan can be found at www.health.govt.nz/publication/new-zealand-suicide-prevention-action-plan-2013-2016

Ends.


© Scoop Media

Men’s Shed

I had a good morning today visiting the local men’s shed and having a bit of a noisy around.

It always amazes me the things that happen in our communities that we may have very little knowledge of. The time, energy and thought that people put into places like this without even blinking is inspirational.


I am hoping that i can add to this local shed by sharing some of my experiences. luckily I do not need to actually build anything!


Buildings

Sorry I am not writing this from any scientific perspective. I have just returned to New Zealand after a trip to London. Now I grew up in London so it felt a bit like a home away from home situation, everything felt familiar but everything felt different etc.
One of the elements I noticed, not surprisingly was the buildings, especially in the centre and city of London. Again not something I had not seen before although it just felt different this time. It was not only the size but the contrast between old and new and how much is fitted in. It felt a little claustrophobic to begin with having got used to the space in NZ. I was a little shocked.
One day I visited a friend who worked for a large insurance company in the city of London. Now not to sound to stereotypical but it was pretty grey. It was raining, the buildings were grey and so were the suits. I turned up wearing a blue Kathmandu jacket and looked very much out of place.  It got me wondering how much people are truly affected by the space they work and live in.
For several years I worked for an organisation that looked at the barriers created by the physical environment to people with impairments e.g. how stairs are a real pain for those that have mobility impairments. Walking around London really made me think how people cope with the volume of people and the buildings they work in. How much does this impact on people’s wellbeing. You could go a whole day without really seeing anything green, and no sheep or cows on the road side!
So how does your building affect you? What happens if you work from home?

Buildings

Sorry I am not writing this from any scientific perspective. I have just returned to New Zealand after a trip to London. Now I grew up in London so it felt a bit like a home away from home situation, everything felt familiar but everything felt different etc.

One of the elements I noticed, not surprisingly was the buildings, especially in the centre and city of London. Again not something I had not seen before although it just felt different this time. It was not only the size but the contrast between old and new and how much is fitted in. It felt a little claustrophobic to begin with having got used to the space in NZ. I was a little shocked.

One day I visited a friend who worked for a large insurance company in the city of London. Now not to sound to stereotypical but it was pretty grey. It was raining, the buildings were grey and so were the suits. I turned up wearing a blue Kathmandu jacket and looked very much out of place.  It got me wondering how much people are truly affected by the space they work and live in.

For several years I worked for an organisation that looked at the barriers created by the physical environment to people with impairments e.g. how stairs are a real pain for those that have mobility impairments. Walking around London really made me think how people cope with the volume of people and the buildings they work in. How much does this impact on people’s wellbeing. You could go a whole day without really seeing anything green, and no sheep or cows on the road side!

So how does your building affect you? What happens if you work from home?

About me

HisBiz is about connecting the business and wellbeing worlds to support prosperous, healthy futures for Kiwi men. It's time to stand up and do something. It's time to put men's wellbeing back in the spotlight.

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